Addiction

Addiction can take many forms and can be one of the most debilitating conditions known to the helping professions. The NHS estimate that at the moment over two million people are battling with addiction in the United Kingdom.

I believe that when people begin on the road to addiction, the substance or behaviour is supportive to them. They feel that that in some way their ability or performance is being improved. The term ‘Dutch courage’ comes to mind. While some people can move on from the need of this support or crutch, others can become addicted. Eventually addiction disrupts an individual’s ability to fulfil healthy human needs and can often end in death. Over the years I have witnessed people putting shelter, food, relationships and children secondary to addiction. The only thing that seems to matter in the height of addiction is obtaining the substance or repeating the behaviour. This not only causes serious personal disruption and consequences for the individual, but also for the family members and loved ones.

With the right support and guidance, people can and do learn to arrest their addiction and begin to live life. Often a range of support is required; an hour in talking therapy once a week is a good start, but additional help may also be required. I can be supportive in enabling you to find the right kind of assistance to help you move forward.

I have worked in addiction in one form or another for twenty years now in several different settings. Whilst I can support people with harm minimisation and relapse prevention interventions, my specialist area is the crises that are faced when the addiction has been managed and the task of life rebuilding is met. When an over reliance on one way of coping is lost, life can seem challenging and complex. My passion is in helping people to rediscover their potential and to be able to support them in finding new and healthy ways of re-engaging with life and begin to rediscover their true identity.    Often people can assimilate society’s negative view of ‘addicts’ which tends to criminalise and isolate them from “normal” society. In my experience once stabilised most people who have struggled with addictions of one form or another are creative, intelligent, imaginative and caring individuals.

If you believe you have a problem with addiction in any form, you are welcome to contact me for a consultation. On my resource page are several links on addiction offering information and advice.